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MON-SAT 09:00 AM-05:00 PM
CALL
+255-754-282-025
EMAIL
contact@kili-expedition.com

What is the Best Time to Climb Kilimanjaro?

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Our prices include hotel accommodations before and after the climb, transportation from the hotel to the trail and back, all park fees, and meals on the mountain. Prices do not include flights, or beverages at the hotel, personal gear and equipment, or tips. Our prices are listed in US Dollars.

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We limit our climbs to 12 people. Can you explain the dates of your group climbs? If you are not spending any extra days before or after the climb, you should book your flight to land on the "Arrival Date" and leave on the "Departure Date". The "Arrival Date" is the day before the climb begins. It represents the latest date you should be in Moshi. We have our trip briefings at 5PM at your hotel on this day, though we can schedule a personal trip briefing for you later in the evening or the next morning if you arrive late. The "Departure Date" is the day after you climb ends, after spending the night at the hotel.

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We have group climbs on the 9 day Northern Circuit, 8 day Lemosho route, 7 day Rongai route, and 7 day Machame route. What routes do you offer for private climbs? We can arrange private climbs on 10 day Northern Circuit/Crater Camp, 9 day Lemosho/Crater Camp, 9 day Northern Circuit, 7-8 day Lemosho route, 7-8 day Shira route, 6-7 day Rongai route, 6-7 day Machame route, 6- 7 day Umbwe route, 5-6 day Marangu route, and 4 day Mount Meru.

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With a group climb, you will be in a party of up to12 climbers who have booked with us separately (strangers). Group climbs are scheduled for set dates on set routes. In a private climb, you will be in a party of people you specifically booked with (friends, family, etc.). Private climbs can be scheduled on any date you choose and on any route. There is no maximum number of climbers for a private climb. The service on the mountain is exactly the same.

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We pair same sex single climbers to share a double room before and after the climb and to share a three person tent during the trek. You can get a single room and single tent for yourself by paying for a single supplement. Single supplements must be arranged at the time of booking.

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We recommend the 9 day Northern Circuit, 8 day Lemosho, and 7 day Rongai routes. These routes offer the best balance of high success rates, beautiful scenery and smaller crowds. 7 day Machame is a nice route as well, but has a lot of other climbers on it.

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Avoiding altitude sickness is key. Do this by walking slowly. Drink lots of water and eat enough food. Go on all optional acclimatization hikes. Consider taking Diamox. Also prevent other illnesses by disinfecting your hands after every time you use the bathroom and before any meals.

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One of the important prerequisites of successful summit is being properly equipped. Ensure that you are well equipped. Print the checklist below and mark it off, it will be an essential part of your preparation for the climb. Please remember to limit the weight of your duffel bag and its content to be carried by the porter on the climb, to 15 kg (30lbs)or less. Extra luggage, including your clothes to wear after the climb, can be left at the hotel in Marangu. Please feel free to contact me should you have question regarding the checklist .Make sure you have everything you need to help you successful summit the Roof of Africa.

Kilimanjaro Gear List

Climbing Equipment

  • Adjustable 2 or 3 section Ski/Trekking poles. 1 pair.
  • Headlamp. A good quality climbers headlamp (Black Diamond brand is very good; www.bdel.com). Bring extra batteries (extra bulbs not necessary for LED headlamps).
  • Running or tennis shoes. 1 pair to wear around camp and also for safari.
  • Light Hiking Boots or Trekking boots. Water proof and very warm.
  • Gaiters. 1 pair used to keep rocks out of shoes and boots dry.
  • Wool or Synthetic Socks. 3 pair heavyweight socks (wool is warmer) to be worn over the liner socks. When layering socks, check fit over feet and Inside boots.
  • Liner Socks. 3 pair of smooth thin wool, nylon or Capilene to be worn next to the skin. This reduces the incidence of blisters and hot-spots and Makes the outer sock last longer before needing to be changed. They should fit well with your heavyweight socks.
  • Lightweight Long Underwear. 2 pair. Tops & bottoms, Capilene, other synthetic or wool. No Cotton. Lightweight is preferable as it is more versatile (worn single in warmer conditions and double layer for colder).
  • Zip-T-neck tops allow more ventilation options. One set of white for intense sunny days and one pair of dark for faster drying gives the most versatility.
  • Synthetic/Soft Shell jacket. Mid- to Heavyweight. A full-zip version is easier to put on and has better ventilation than a pullover.
  • Insulated Synthetic Pants. Be sure pants can be removed while wearing boots.
  • Down or Synthetic jacket. Medium to heavy weight with hood.
  • Hard Shell jacket w/ hood. We recommend a waterproof breathable
  • shell material with full front zipper, underarm zips, and no insulation. This outer layer protects against wind and rain.
  • Hard Shell Pants. Waterproof, breatheable. Full length side zippers preferred because it allows easy removal of pants.
  • Handwear
  • Lightweight synthetic gloves. 2 pair, quick drying material. Should fit comfortably inside heavy mitts.
  • Hard Shell Mitts w/ insulated remove able. 1 pair each. A good pair of ski mittens/gloves work well. Headwear
  • Balaclava. Look for a simple lightweight model.
  • Warm Lightweight synthetic/wool hat. Hat should cover ears.
  • Baseball cap/sun hat. One with a good visor to shade the nose and eyes. Synthetic is nice as it dries quickly.
  • Bandana. Used to shade your neck.

Glacier glasses. 100% UV, IR, high quality optical lenses designed for mountain use, must have side covers, leashes, and a nose guard is particularly helpful. No more than 8% light transmission. If you wear contact lenses we recommend packing a spare pair of glasses—it is a good idea to have these with “photo-gray” or equivalent light-sensitive material so they can double as emergency sunglasses. If you wear glasses we recommend prescription glacier glasses (gray or amber). Talk to your eye care professional to find out where prescription glacier glasses are available. Regular sunglasses are not dark enough and do not provide any side protection from the sun.

  • Trekking Backpack. A day pack big enough to carry water bottles, camera, lunch and extra clothing. 35L-40L max.
  • Water Bottles: 2 to 3 Wide mouth bottles with minimum 1 Litre capacity per bottle. No water bag or bladder systems, they freeze or are hard to fill.
  • Pee Bottle (1 Liter). For cold nights in the tent. Large mouth, clearly marked bottle.
  • Pee Funnel (for women). For cold nights in the tent. (Optional)
  • Sunscreen. SPF 30 or better, 2 small tubes. Make sure that the sun screen is not older than 6 months. Sunscreen older than six months loses half of its SPF rating.
  • Lipscreen. SPF 40 or better, at least 2 sticks. Not older than 6 months.
  • Water Purification tablets. 2 bottles.
  • Sleeping bag. Down is lighter and less bulky, but more expensive than Synthetics.
  • Closed Cell foam pad. One full length closed-cell foam.
  • Self Inflating pad. One 3/4 or full length w/repair kit. No Ultralights. Traveling
  • Duffle Bag. This duffle bag is needed to keep your gear in while transporting. A rubber or synthetic material is recommended for water resistance.
  • Duffle Bag. A small duffle can be nice for storing things at the hotel during the expedition and extra clothing while traveling.
  • Plastic bags. To line stuff sacks to keep gear dry and line pack. Trash Compactor bags are best.
  • Trail snack food items. Bring your favorite energy bars, GU packets for summit day, drink mixes etc.
  • Toiletry bag. Include toilet paper, soap, wet wipes, toothbrush, towel, hand sanitizer, foot powder, dust mask, ear plugs etc.

Small personal first-aid kit.

    Personal prescription medications in their original containers
  1. Over-the-counter anti-diarrhea medication (e.g., bismuth subsalicylate, loperamide, pepto)
  2. Antibiotic for self-treatment of moderate to severe diarrhea
  3. Antihistamine
  4. Decongestant, alone or in combination with antihistamine
  5. Anti-motion sickness medication
  6. Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen, or other medication for pain or fever
  7. Mild laxative
  8. Cough suppressant/expectorant
  9. Throat lozenges
  10. Antacid
  11. Antifungal and antibacterial ointments or creams
  12. 1% hydrocortisone cream
  13. Epinephrine auto-injector (e.g., EpiPen), if history of severe allergic reaction.
  14. Other Important Items:
  15. Sunscreen (preferably SPF 25 or greater)
  16. Aloe gel for sunburns-small tube
  17. Basic first-aid items (adhesive bandages, tweezers, cotton tipped Applicators)
  18. Antibacterial hand wipes or alcohol-based hand sanitizer Containing at least 60% alcohol (1)
  19. Moleskin for blisters
  20. Lubricating eye drops Water purification tablets-should drink bottled water…but just in case.

Drugs/Medications/Prescriptions.

Climbers should bring Pepto Bismol. Ciprofloxin (Cipro) 500mg tablets for traveler’s diarrhea and for urinary tract infections. Azithromycin (Z-pak) 250mg tablets for non-gastrointestinal

infections. Acetazolamide (Diamox) 125 or 250 mg tablets for altitude sickness. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) 200mg tablets for altitude headaches, sprains, aches, etc. Excedrin for headaches.
Acetaminophen (Tylenol) 325mg tablets for stomach sensitivity.

Optional Items

  1. Camera extra lenses and film ( ASA 200 film recommended)
  2. Binoculars
  3. Pocket knife
  4. Notebook, Pen / pencil
  5. Plastic bag to keep clothing dry (masking tape)
  6. Energy snacks and sweet.

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We have sleeping bags and trekking poles available for rent. You do not have to reserve them. You can acquire your rentals and pay for them at the trip briefing. If you need other gear, our staff can take you to independently owned shops to purchase or rent gear. However, we are not responsible for the quality of the gear you obtain at these shops. We provide foam sleeping mats for all climbers.

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Kilimanjaro is best climbed when the weather is dry. There are two rainy seasons in Tanzania. The long rainy season is from mid-March to early June. The short rainy season is from November to early December. Therefore the best times to climb Kilimanajro are mid-December to early-March, and mid-June to end of October.

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Definitely. It can rain and snow all year round. The base of the mountain is in the rainforest. A quality waterproof jacket and pants is an absolute must.

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In general, expect to sleep in temperatures as low as 20F and to hike in temperatures as low as -20F. It can be even colder. Be prepared.

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We serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, which consist of western style meals

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We can accommodate vegetarian and vegan diets. For more specific requirements, we will try our best but please contact us to discuss.

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At each campsite, we set up a private toilet tent, which contains a plastic toilet. Each campsite also has public "long drop" toilets. If you need to use the bathroom on the trail, find a spot behind a tree or rock. We recommend bringing pee bottles so that you do not have to leave your tent multiple times during the night to urinate.

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You don't. You can use wet wipes if you like to towel off. We also provide wash bins with soap for you to wash your hands and face.

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Our guides are highly experienced to manage altitude sickness, which is the biggest obstacle on the mountain. They are certified Wilderness First Responders. They conduct twice daily health checks to measure your oxygen saturation and pulse. A rescue plan is in place in the event of an emergency. Bottled oxygen, a portable stretcher, and a first aid kit is carried on every climb.

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No. We bring multiple guides on every climb so that when a climber needs to descend, it does not affect the rest of the party.

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You will need a passport that is valid for at least six more months. You will also need a flight card which you will receive on the plane. Finally you need a Tanzanian visa.

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USA, Canadian, British and most European citizens can obtain their visas upon arrival at Kilimanjaro National Airport. The cost is $100 for USA passport holders and $50 for others. If you are a citizen of a different country, please check with your embassy whether you can obtain a visa upon arrival.

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Nothing is required but many are recommended. A certificate of yellow fever vaccination is required for entry into Tanzania when arriving from countries where yellow fever is present.

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Our climbs begin and end in Moshi. Moshi is about 25 miles from Kilimanjaro National Airport (JRO). You should fly into Kilimanjaro National Airport and we can arrange for pick up.

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We do not book flights. We recommend flying on KLM. Flights from the USA to JRO typically range from $1,500 to $3,500, depending on the season. Vayama is a good source for domestic Tanzanian flights if you want to extend your vacation to other parts of Tanzania or East Africa.

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Unfortunately, we do not. With so many different safari options, it is difficult to put together groups who want to travel on the same itinerary on the same dates. Therefore we only offer private safaris.

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No, we must make preparations for your safari before your trip begins. All safaris must be pre-booked.

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The only additional item you need for the safari is perhaps binoculars. Other than that, the clothing you have for your climb is sufficient


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